Category Archives: photographs

Finally seeing my fact checking in person

Scholastic booth display at ALA Annual 2016 with two book covers: Pope Francis and Switzerland

Pope Francis and Switzerland, two books I fact checked at the Scholastic Booth

This year when I went to ALA Annual, I had a chance to see my fact checking work in person and talk to people who know the work. When I walked by the Scholastic booth, I spotted covers of two books that I’d recently fact checked and stopped and stared. They’re in the picture; Pope Francis and Switzerland. When I struck up a conversation with the people at the booth, one of them actually knew Editorial Directions, the company I work for. It was one of the most gratifying moments for a job where the distance between my work and the product is huge.

The next day when I stopped at the booth, I had a longer conversation with another person from Scholastic about fact checking and was able to see and hold two books that I’d fact checked; Vultures and Cybercriminals. Then on Sunday, I think I had a wonderful bonus because for all of these books Scholastic has a website with added information and ebooks providing new ways to access the information.

I’m still smiling when I think of seeing and holding books that I played a part in. Every book that I fact check leaves me with knowledge of new sources and nuggets of facts. I love the process of learning and having a role in the reference materials that students use.

 

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New Lewes Library and Pokemon Go at the old

I’ve joined the masses who are hooked on Pokemon Go and so far its helped me discover places I didn’t know about and start up conversations.

This past Monday,  I was volunteering at the beautiful new Lewes Public Library which officially opened on June 20th. Every time that I’ve been in either to help out or to look on my own, the library has been full. On this Monday morning, I began by sharing some of the wonderful posters I picked up at ALA Annual Conference to help decorate the space and discuss Pokemon Go. It turns out that there are two gyms near the library, two PokeStops across the railroad tracks at the old library, one was even at the Children’s Learning Garden where Maureen was headed to for a storytime.

Once Maureen went out to run the storytime, I didn’t have time to think of Pokemon as the Children’s section was busy. In the midst of shelving books, I was answering questions and seeing what the right space can do. There was a group of tween girls discussing book series that they love amid exclamations of ‘Have you read this one?’ Little kids were picking books by pulling them out and finding ones they enjoy. I love a busy library and it did take a while to get the shelving done but it was more important to answer every question.

When I finally left, I stopped by the library sign to check out the PokeStop and got into a conversation with two women in scrubs. I showed them where the PokeStop near the sign was and pointed out which was the Children’s Learning Garden was from where we were. After that, I walked around for a while, catching a few Pokemon before lunch then later stopping behind a motel to find a mural and a PokeStop. I think a lot of the set up of the stops is slightly random other than being in public places but for me, they’re getting me exploring. I’m looking forward to seeing how this game builds interaction in other places.

 

A lovely mural I never knew about but thanks to #pokemongo I found it. #mypictures #instagram

A photo posted by Kate K.F. (@ceitfianna) on Jul 11, 2016 at 12:06pm PDT

 

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Good Book Days and Boston

One of my favorite parts of being a librarian is seeing when someone finds the book that they’ve wanted and needed. As an educator, I adore seeing how there isn’t just one place that a person can learn. In the past two weeks, I’ve seen kids falling in love with science and put the right books into the best hands.

Scholastic Book Fairs have a magic about them, the ones I attended in elementary school were held in the library. Weeks before, I’d fill out my form, debating which books I wanted and then they’d arrive, beautiful new books. Then I’d wander around the school library staring at all the other books, the erasers, the pens and pencils, the bookmarks, there waiting for me to choose them. Earlier this week, I was lucky enough to stand behind the register at a book fair and watch kids have that same experience. The shapes of the erasers have changed from fruits to smartphones and video game controllers, but the love of finding just that one is still there. I was impressed by how easy it was to come in and run the fair as well as how reasonable the prices were for books, 1 to 3 dollars for new paperbacks. The range of options from encyclopedias to every genre and pens that lit up or allowed secret writing.  I know I was tempted by the Star Wars’ stickers and three dollars for the new Misty Copeland autobiography, but this time left with nothing for myself other than the joy of seeing kids buying what they wanted from the fair.

The second book day was an aftereffect of the Lewes Library preparing to move. Over the past few months, I’ve been helping Maureen, the head of Youth Services to weed the children’s library in preparation for shifting to the new space. I’ve found this a fascinating process of looking at what books don’t make sense to keep because they’re out of date nonfiction ones, there are multiple copies or they haven’t been taken out recently. Yesterday all thirty boxes of books ranging from board books to juvenile nonfiction were piled on tables and educators in the area were given a chance to take what they needed. In the course of the afternoon, teachers left with boxes and bags full of free books to help new families, fill classroom libraries and preschool libraries. It was wonderful to wander among them and see some of the kids who came along and recommend books I knew were good. Everything was free which made it even better as the teachers realized how these books could help their kids and then there would be space for newer copies and better editions in the library. At the end of the day, there were only eight boxes left which will find better homes and a few came home with me. I didn’t have a copy of The Queen of Attolia and picture books to send to my nephew.

Last week, I went to Boston as I’m planning on moving there in the near future. Southern Delaware is wonderful but there’s an energy in the Boston area along with many friends that will help me to do all that I want to do. Many of my favorite moments in Boston came from being in a place where people were excited to learn and share the joy of knowing something new. At the New England Aquarium, I heard kids and parents pulling each other to different exhibits and talked with a woman who loves her membership to the Aquarium. She was talking about the fur seals and how well she knew all of them. As I wandered into the bookstores and the gorgeous main Cambridge Public Library branch, I was reminded of the energy that comes from being in a place where everyone is looking at the world around them with the mixture that comes from the past and future alongside each other. Below is the wonderful Greenway carousel which was inspired by children’s drawings and connects science and fun.

2016-04-12 15.53.49

One of the unexpected highlights of the trip was walking around Boston Common and seeing the preparations for the marathon, the booths waiting and what would be the starting line lying on the ground. Boston is a great city and one I plan on exploring more. As I keep looking for jobs, my net is still open wide and if a school or a library comes together in another city, I’ll grab it, but I’m planning on finding a way to live in the Boston area.

 

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ALA Midwinter-Seeing where I fit in

January 24th to 28th was ALA Midwinter and held in Philadelphia, which meant I was able to go and explore more of how I fit into the huge organization that is ALA. Due to the kindness of geography, I’ve now attended both an Annual and Midwinter conference and they’ve helped me to understand better where I fit into the diverse world of librarians. At this conference, I participated in a few events that to me summed up this issue of understanding what I want to make of ALA. Also I want to talk about Philadelphia, which is the city of my heart.

To begin with, I grew up outside Philadelphia in Swarthmore, Philly has always been the city of my life. After I graduated college, I interned for a year at a museum on Penn’s Landing and spent months taking the train to Market East and then walking out to the river. I’ve stood on Market street and froze while the Mummers marched by and worried about missing the last train home after being out on South Street. For this visit, I was staying with my brother in New Jersey and so took one of the commuter lines back and forth, that meant I did miss out on some social aspects of the conference, but did see my family. Also the only reasons I’ve had for going to the Convention Center were mainly to see the Philadelphia Flower Show. To see all of the ALA signage and publishers that I’d last seen in Chicago in my own city was strange and wonderful, it helped me feel more like ALA was more a part of my life.

Now to begin with the events that made this conference click for me. The first was that I went in to see the opening of the exhibit hall which I had missed in Chicago due to attending an alumni reception for the University of Michigan School of Information. This year, I was there when the doors were opened and it was a great beginning to my conference as I had a few wonderful moments of different worlds crossing. First I found the booth for YALSA where I would volunteer on Saturday morning and will speak about next.

Then I came upon the Harry Potter Alliance, a wonderful organization that channels the energy of fandom into social action. I knew of them because a dear friend who works in politics has been involved with them for a long time and it turns out the people there knew of her. This was their first time at an ALA conference and it seemed a highly successful one considering that the wizard activist ribbons they were handing out were highly popular. In the same aisle, I spotted SFWA or the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, who were also first time exhibitors, as a reader of many SFF blogs and writers, I’m aware of their work. It was nice to see them connecting with librarians though I was surprised that they hadn’t exhibited before. I went home with books in my wonderful conference bag and a sense that the conference was reaching out in interesting ways to fandom. There was also a quintet of Mummers strutting around the exhibit hall which made me grin like mad. Below is not the best picture but captures their energy and the feel of the opening.

Mummers' performers

Mummers at Midwinter

Saturday morning after a cold wait at the PATCO station, I arrived at the opening of the exhibit hall to volunteer for two hours at the YALSA booth. This was probably one of the best choices I’ve ever made connected to ALA. I was able to see the traffic going by, talk to anyone who was curious about YALSA; long-time members, students, and see how much of a community exists. 9 to 10 was quiet as many people were at meetings, but at 10, I was joined by another volunteer and by the time I left at 11, there was a crowd of librarians and friends at the booth. It was great to see friends meeting up and colleagues discussing the swiftly changing world of young adult librarianship. I’m going to work to become more involved in YALSA, because they’re a huge part of where the world of libraries are going.

After lunch with a relative, I headed to the Best Fiction for Young Adults teen session, which was amazing. The teen session is where local teens from a school or library come and talk to librarians about their thoughts on the long list of possible books for inclusion into the Best Fiction for Young Adults’ list. I learned what books the kids were reading and clearly recommending to each other because many books were talked about by multiple books. Those works brought about interesting moments as it was obvious which ones were loved, which ones kids’ thoughts depended on their own preferences. There were few that were truly hated, most of the time, a book didn’t work for someone, which was informative as if there was time, they explained why. It was a great reminder of how aware many kids are of what they like and don’t like and what’s good writing. I didn’t stay for the entire time, but most of it as I wanted to talk to the Joblist, then home for a Robert Burns’ supper.

The next major event that felt to me as if it had snuck in from a different sort of convention was waiting in line to get a copy of Fangirl signed by Rainbow Rowell. I wasn’t even aware of this signing until Friday, but due to having a friend who follows her on Twitter, I was one of the early ones in line. Macmillian press did a great job organizing the signing, everyone got a piece of paper that assured them a signed copy. In theory that meant we could have left and come back but most of us chose to lean against the back wall and hang out. There’s a vibe that you get when everyone’s waiting for a chance to meet someone who’s books matter to them, a friendly camaraderie that made the time go quickly. Most of us were reading or talking with friends and all of us were hauling about bags loaded down with books, because we were librarians. Then Rainbow Rowell was a joy and her entire backlist and new book are high on my to-read pile.

The final event I attended was the Morris’ awards and Nonfiction awards presentation that was done after the announcement of the winners of the Youth Media Awards. Since the announcements started at 8 am, I followed them on my Twitter, which was such fun. All the librarians, publishers, authors, bloggers and various book news’ outlets were sharing the winners in different ways. I was able to see some of the same energy when I got to the convention center as the noise spilled out of the various rooms where the announcements were going on.

Later, the winners of the Morris awards for the Debut fiction and Nonfiction award for young adults spoke in a different space and were available for signing. Two of the speeches left a great impression on me and made me even more conscious of the kind of librarian that I wish to be. Carrie Mesrobian, the author of Sex and Violence, spoke about how growing up she was a library rat. As a child, she was involved in many activities and then as a teen would do her own research but rarely spoke to librarians. Now she sees how those librarians made sure the books she wanted were there and that she wished more activities had been available. It was a powerful reminder of how sometimes a library can do a huge amount by just being there. The other speech that hit home was by Elizabeth Ross author of Belle Epoque, she spoke about how in her family, her sister was seen as the bookish one and that her brother didn’t read a great deal. When she decided that she wanted to write a book, she had to go against these expectations that she had internalized of herself as not a reader. Its so easy to implant these ideas when adults talk to kids and air their own perceptions instead of leaving kids space to define themselves. As a librarian and an educator, I think one of the key jobs I have is to provide resources for kids to explore, to listen and especially to let them tell me who they are.

It took me some time to put these thoughts together because ALA and its conferences have many layers and as a newer librarian, I’m still working out how I fit inside the organization. I feel like in Philadelphia, I was able to find my feet and get a better idea of how as a youth librarian, I can be part of the future of libraries. To end, here’s a picture of the Delaware River that I saw as I headed back to New Jersey and my regular life.

Philadelphia Waterfront

Philadelphia Waterfront

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Busy and strange month

January always seems to go by faster than I expect and my 2014 has started quickly and is going to end in a busy way. I’m preparing to go to ALA Midwinter as I’m now living on the East Coast which means I can visit family while getting to spend time with librarians. Before heading north tomorrow, I wanted to recap some of my favorite events that have happened this month, because there’s been a lot of creativity and reminders of how I am a librarian for me.

To start off, I helped run a great celebration on New Year’s Day called Noon Year’s Day. This is an event that was inspired by something that happens at the Delaware Art Museum and was the first time it was run at the Lewes Library. The set up is rather simple, throw a party for the kids in the area and instead of celebrating the New Year at midnight, do it at noon. The big part of the set up was attaching a parachute, a small one to ceiling and filling it with balloons that could be dropped when noon hit.

Noon Year's Day

Noon Year’s Day

Below you can see the wonderful chaos as the balloons dropped when the countdown happened. I found a countdown on timeanddate.com which was projected onto the wall. There were three crafts and food and in the end almost a hundred kids went through, because its been a cold winter and this was a great distraction. I love events like this, that aren’t too hard to pull together, a lot of the craft supplies and set up were based off of what the Children’s Librarian does for Summer Reading. It was simply a matter of altering them for New Year’s. Crowns with 2014 on them, handmade tambourines made out of paper plates and using pipe cleaners to create fake sparklers and string cheerios on to feed the birds plus seats for the adults. Entire families came and enjoyed themselves including making a lot of noise when it was noon. It was one of the best New Year’s parties that I’ve ever been to for the joy going on in it.

A few days later, I was able to revisit a favorite place of my childhood and feel rejuvenated by the presence of art. The Coastal Camera Club is something that both my parents are active with and I’ve been attending meetings. Its a wonderful organization that welcomes all levels of photographers and works to help them be creative and thoughtful. A part of that is they organize trips to places to take photos and there was a trip to , now this is a place that I used to go to as a young girl. The gardens were built by some members of the DuPont family with the idea that they would be open to the public, plant research goes on and in the summer performances. The day we went it was bitter cold so we spent most of our time in the Conservatory, which is a sprawling series of greenhouses containing all types of gardens. Since it was a cold day, there were few other people there and I was able to walk around following my eye. This is how I prefer to look at art and that day, all the plants were art and I found a way to capture some of their beauty with my camera. I’m going to post one of my pictures since a place I’d forgotten is the Children’s Garden that is full of playful fountains and statues that seem to invite you to another world. Below is a picture of one of my favorite places in the Conservatory, the Orchid Room where I was lucky enough to be in on my own for a number of minutes.

Orchid Room at Longwood Gardens

Orchid Room at Longwood Gardens

Also this month, I finally had a chance to read Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell and it was a book that surprised me in the best way. My review can be read As someone who has been involved in many types of fandom and roleplaying, various activities that made me on the edges, this book clicked with me. Rowell was able to capture how powerful the internet can be for finding your tribe out in the world and also how writing fanfiction provides another way to connect with favorite authors. I would recommend to anyone who is working with teenagers and college students and isn’t sure what they’re doing on Tumblr or what’s so special about Teen Wolf to read this book.

On that note, I need to go and finish getting ready for Midwinter and I hope to meet with one of my groups, the librarians.

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Connecting through Art: Rehoboth Beach Film Festival and Grounds for Sculpture

One of the reasons that I love being a librarian is seeing how books and media can connect people, it’s also why I adore being part of fandom. Yet I’ve noticed that some of the random moments of ‘oh look at this’ that happen easily online can be trickier to have happen in person unless you’re in the right sort of situation. In my experience, I’ve been able to find these interactions at conferences where there’s this idea that everyone is there to enjoy or learn and focus on the same general topic whether its science-fiction fantasy, anime or the world of libraries.

Recently though I was reminded of how sometimes all it takes is to be celebrating art in the same space. At the beginning of November I attended which feels like a wonderful small conference just about films. Then the Friday after Thanksgiving, I went to , a beautiful sculpture garden in New Jersey, where it was accepted to point out to a stranger a piece of art they might have missed. I’m going to take this entry to talk about the films I saw at the festival and the wonderful atmosphere of it and share some of the art I saw at Grounds for Sculpture. Art is important and the way it helps people connect with strangers always amazes me.

The genius of the Rehoboth Beach Film Festival is how its set up, as there aren’t many movie theaters in this part of Southern Delaware, the festival is held behind Movies at Midway. Now Movies at Midway is right off Route 1 as part of a long shopping area and has a large parking lot in front and back. They let the festival take over about half the theaters for their use and erect a tent directly behind the theater. This tent is the heart of the festival and a place where tickets can be bought, people will happily sit down with strangers and ask, what did you last see? Then in the movies, before and after, waiting in line and after, everyone shares their thoughts. There’s good food provided by local vendors, the Film Festival sells merchandise including cheap videos and DVDs which also create conversation. Also many people will see a lot of films and have a great deal to say. My family has visitors every time it happens because our friends enjoy it so much. This year, I only saw three feature-length films, but they were all films that I would highly recommend, mainly because I want more people to discuss them with. What I found interesting was that I somehow ended up seeing films focusing on young people and that felt as if they’re part of the same world as a lot of young adult fiction. I also saw a collection of German shorts which is harder to review but I recommend if you find any shorts on Vimeo or YouTube to give them a look.

Key of Life

Key of Life is a strange and wonderful Japanese film that reminded me a lot of an anime or a screwball comedy from the 1930s more than a modern comedy. The premise is fairly simple, two men go to a bathhouse and one of them steals the locker key of the other, when they are knocked unconscious. They end up switching lives and everything gets more and more complicated as both men work to understand exactly who they’re meant to be because nothing is truly as it seems. When I left this film, I was laughing and wanted to share it with everyone I knew. A warning about is that there is a subplot about gangsters so there is some blood but not a lot and the violence is not the focus of the film.

The Rocket

The Rocket is a beautiful and difficult film from Laos about tradition, progress and family. At the heart of the film is a young boy who’s believed cursed and his family who are forced to leave their village due to a new dam. This move sets off a cascade of difficult changes which they struggle against along with the remnants of the past all around them. It’s a painful film with violence, hatred and a great deal of honesty. The Rocket is also a beautiful film amongst the varied landscape of Laos and it shows a country in the midst of change. A warning that in the trailer, there’s nudity and violence but it gives a good sense of the film itself.

Wadjda

Wadjda is a film that has been given a lot of press that it well deserves as it’s the first film by a Saudi Arabian woman director. The story felt to me like a very good young adult novel in terms of the story and structure. Wadjda is a girl of about 12 who lives with her mother and finds lots of ways to be herself though by doing that she ends up getting into trouble. She decides that she wants a bike and begins to save up money for it and the movie shows her struggles and joys as well as all the moments that define being a girl and woman in Saudi Arabia. One of the most interesting comments I heard about it was my father said he felt that the movie kept repeating how women are squelched in Saudi Arabia. My mother and I disagreed since to us it didn’t feel like that was being presented that way but instead the director was showing how life is for women.

Another reason I found all of these films fascinating was the glimpses into growing up, families in places that I don’t know. The discussions all of them created were wonderful and I hope to have more about them in time.

At Grounds for Sculpture, a park that sits near the Hamilton train station in Hamilton, New Jersey which was once the fairgrounds for the New Jersey State Fair, other sorts of conversations were created. The park itself isn’t huge but its big enough that if you begin to walk, you can get lost in small paths and find yourself confronted with art. The day we went, I was in the mood to be on my own and so started to go about on my own, but as I walked as I found sculptures, I also found other people. When I saw a person walk by a sculpture that they’d passed, I told them about it. To be able to create a place where not only are you surrounded by art but others and feel comfortable speaking about the art to me is an amazing place. One thing that Grounds for Sculpture has done brilliantly is they’ve created places enclosed by walls or trees that invite you to peek in and feel as if you’re the only one there. To end I’m going to share a picture of one of these places where I felt I’d found another world, which is what art is meant to do.

A grove of statues.

It's been too long since I've been here.

A post shared by Kate K.F. (@ceitfianna) on

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Halloween-looking sideways

Halloween has always been one of my favorite holidays, because its a chance when everyone can play openly with their imaginations. For the past ten years, my costume has been simple but I’ve found rather effective:

As you can see, I’ve painted the top half of my face to look like a red fox, which was a skill I learned how to do when I took a theatrical make up class at a local theater in middle school. That was one of my favorite theater classes because I find it fascinating how it doesn’t take much to shift the character of your face and body.

Halloween is full of people who understand that and a chance for everyone to share various sides of themselves. Since the explosion of YA lit and cosplay becoming more widely recognized, costumes based on what someone loves are easier to spot as we share our inspirations. When I was in elementary school, I had two costumes that were my favorites and both of them grew out of my love of books. One was Glinda the Good Witch from the Oz books, I based my costume on illustrations in the original hardcovers that my parents had and my mother and I found all the makings at a craft store. The other favorite was Will Scarlett/Stuteley from Paul Creswick’s Robin Hood, I made myself a felt hat and my father cut me a quarter staff which I carried to school. For most of my life until my parents moved out of that house, the staff rested in the corner and the hat perched on my desk chair, because Robin Hood is a story that I happen to love. As I grew older I got involved in theater and Live Action Role Play which gave me chances to try on various guises and learn more about how to make someone see me differently. When I try on another identity through a costume, writing, roleplay or another avenue, I find myself examining things from more angles.

Now my costumes are simpler but I’ve found that this face paint gets everyone to look twice at me. Today when I went to pick up something, a woman meowed at me and other people smiled in surprise when they noticed that no, I wasn’t looking normal. I think my favorite reactions to this face paint are the quick smiles as that person has had a little bit of weird in their life.

I hope everyone who does something for Halloween enjoys it and remember to look at the world a little sideways sometimes to see that nothing’s ever quite what it seems. As in Celtic mythology, Samhain and the turning of the seasons means today is when the walls between the worlds are thinner. Also its a time to celebrate the harvest of the summer and prepare for the cold of winter. Brew a hot drink and keep your eyes open. Happy Halloween!

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